School News

Sky Nite is Shining Bright

The following is an interview that spotlights Sky Nite, new Maharishi School student and Canadian National Youth Champion of Hip Hop.
 

Let's face it. When we think of hip-hop dancing, we don't normally associate it with our neighbor to the north. But hip-hop is popular in Canada, and we have the Canadian National Youth Champion right here in Maharishi School.

Sky Nite was born in LA and lived there until he was 10 years old, when he then moved to Vancouver with his family. His father, Randy, is a professional film editor, and after starting as a student assistant in Los Angeles, he worked his way to the top of the career ladder and contributed to many motion picture projects. Sky's mother, Noel, was an aspiring actress, so Sky had plenty of encouragement toward the arts and performance. Maharishi School Newsroom talked to Sky to find out more:

MSN: How long have you been interested in hip-hop?

SN: About 5 years.

MSN: What inspired you to get into it?

SN: When I was little, my Mom forced me to go to a Jazz class. I didn’t want to go, but when I was there I saw that there were dancing competitions, and that was interesting to me, competing.

MSN: What’s involved in getting the edge for hip-hop in the competitions?

SN: Once you have the choreography, you have to practice it a lot, clean it up, and bring out some attitude to make it unique.

MSN: Do you do your own choreography?

SN: So far I’ve been choreographed by my coach, but now I’m starting to do my own. I recently choreographed a group hip-hop routine, and we’ll be performing on April 10th, for a Benefit Concert at Sondheim Theatre here in Fairfield.
MSN: How long have you lived in Fairfield and attended Maharishi School?

SN: Six months.

MSN: What do you think about it so far?

SN: It’s interesting and different. The structure at school is different, it’s more orderly. At my last school we had self-directed study.

MSN: How was that?

SN: It was interesting and also not so good sometimes. It gave you a choice to be lax when you wanted to, which was good and bad.

MSN: What brought you here?


SN: My parents were practicing Transcendental Meditation and had always wanted to bring me and my brothers here to this school, at some point in their lives.

MSN: Did you practice TM?

SN: No, I learned when I came here.

MSN: Did you want to learn TM?

SN: No, not really. I didn’t want to leave all my friends, and so was resisting everything about coming here at first.

MSN: Would you say that practicing TM has impacted your life in any way?

SN: Yes, it’s good, I like it. It seemed to have an effect right away. I feel that I’m getting on better with people.

MSN: In what way?

SN: I guess I’m more open to talking with people, and more open when speaking with people.

MSN: Have you noticed any thing else?

SN: I haven’t been getting as sick as I used to.

MSN: Do you think you’ll stay here for the next few years?

SN: Most likely I will, now that I know everyone.

MSN: Are you happy?

SN: Yes, I feel happy with my life and happy at school. It’s more blissful here.

MSN: Happier than living in Canada?

SN: Yes, I can do more of what I like.

MSN: Why do you think that is?

SN: The Recreation Center is open more, so I can practice basket ball whenever I want. I now have my license, since I’ve turned 16, and would not have it for two years if I was still in Canada.

MSN: What would you say is the most important thing in life?

SN: Happiness

MSN: What is happiness?

SN: Doing what you like to do. If you do what you like to do, you’ll be happy.

MSN: If you could tell President Obama something about this school, what would you say?

SN: I’d say to him, “You should take a look at TM. It’s universal, and if it gets spread, that would be cool.”

MSN: Thank you Sky!

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